solutions

Moral solutions to our problems of greed, intolerance, inequality, and exploitation by those who do not embrace our shared moral imperative of mutual service.
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On Service and Love: Sharing Ourselves through Serving Others

Service, in its deepest sense, is an act of love. By serving others, I am sharing myself. I am giving something very personal to those I serve. I am expressing my love of humanity through my personal acts of service. I am showing those I serve that I accept them and wish to help them move forward. Being in service is to embrace our mutual humanity and to express our acceptance and understanding of what we all share. As well, what I do in service is always a unique act, because it comes from me. While the actual service I provide may be the same service that someone else might provide, because my service comes from me—because I am the one who is giving of myself—my service is unique. My service has unique meaning to me; and as well, can have unique meaning to those I serve. But those I serve must appreciate my service, else the bond of love is broken. If I give of myself through service, but those whom I serve take my service for granted—if they ignore or marginalize, or worse, demean, or belittle my efforts—the virtuous cycle of service is broken. My service is unappreciated; therefore, my social […]

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The Three Virtues of Service: More Than Just Doing What You Love

Being of service is empowering to each and every one of us. The more we are of service; the better we become at being of service; the better we feel about ourselves; the better we feel about others; the better our outlook on life, on society, and on our collective futures; the more we become morally and economically viable; the more we value ourselves. Service is a self-perpetuating cycle of emotional, economic, and social power. Through my acts of service, I thereby demonstrate my extrinsic value to others, as well as build intrinsic value within myself. I feel my personal value swell as I act in service to others. Experiencing their gratitude, I am, myself, validated, buoyed, and empowered. I become more than I was before. By focusing on the needs of others, I actualize myself through service. When I know I can do something to help someone—when I have learned to be an expert at providing a service, or even have simply improved my existing abilities to serve—I thereby feel welcomed and valued by society. I feel I am of value to others; and I feel I have value within myself. I know I can make a difference. I […]

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1. Fight for Fifteen – Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

Fight for Fifteen – Raise the Minimum Wage to $15/hour Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

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Income-Guaranteed

Guaranteed Basic Income: A Concept Whose Time Has Come

What If Everybody Didn’t Have to Work to Get Paid? Advocates say that a guaranteed basic income can lead to more creative, fulfilling work. The question is how to fund it. Reposted from The Atlantic DAVID R. WHEELER MAY 18, 2015 Scott Santens has been thinking a lot about fish lately. Specifically, he’s been reflecting on the aphorism, “If you give a man a fish, he eats for a day. If you teach a man to fish, he eats for life.” What Santens wants to know is this: “If you build a robot to fish, do all men starve, or do all men eat?” Santens is 37 years old, and he’s a leader in the basic income movement—a worldwide network of thousands of advocates (26,000 on Reddit alone) who believe that governments should provide every citizen with a monthly stipend big enough to cover life’s basic necessities. The idea of a basic income has been around for decades, and it once drew support from leaders as different as Martin Luther King Jr. and Richard Nixon. But rather than waiting for governments to act, Santens has started crowdfunding his own basic income of $1,000 per month. He’s nearly halfway to his […]

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2. Help Families Work–Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

Help Families Work – Family Friendly Workplaces and Practices Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

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If we do not lay out ourselves in the service of mankind whom should we serve? Abigail Adams: Letter to John Thaxter (29 September 1778).

Why We Fight: Finding the Core of Our Humanity to Avoid Cultural Conflict and Embrace Our Call to Service

Our world is full of competing and conflicting ideas about what to believe and how to behave. We argue about what is right and what is wrong, about what is best for ourselves and for each other, and about how we are supposed to live our lives. Our wide range of religious beliefs—Christian, Jew, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu, Sikh, Taoist, Wiccan, Mormon, Atheist, Agnostic, Cherokee, and Crow—assures a steady debate over the moral imperatives we each hold as sacred, whether we believe them from God, from Nature, or from ourselves. As well, we tussle and fight about political and economic issues, taking polar opposite positions on nearly every social, economic, or political question that arises. We humans do seem to bicker, don’t we? It is no secret that we disagree more than we agree when it comes to religious faith or the lack thereof. Certainly, religious conflict has resulted in countless deaths historically; but the true driver of human warfare is not religion. Only about 7% of all historical wars have been caused by religious conflict. Wars over resources and political conflicts vastly outweigh those based on religious differences. But undoubtedly, these two sets of motivators—religion and politics—are the root causes […]

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3. Expand Social Security–Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

Expand Social Security – Too Big to Fail is Too Big to Have Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

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4. Bust Up Wall Street–Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

Bust Up Wall Street – Too Big to Fail is Too Big to Have Robert Reich’s The Big Picture: Ten Ideas to Save the Economy

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happy buddah

Meaning Is Healthier Than Happiness: Genetic Evidence Shows Happiness without Meaning is Empty

People who are happy but have little-to-no sense of meaning in their lives have the same gene expression patterns as people who are enduring chronic adversity. EMILY ESFAHANI SMITH AUG 1, 2013 (Reposted from The Atlantic) For at least the last decade, the happiness craze has been building. In the last three months alone, over 1,000 books on happiness were released on Amazon, including Happy Money, Happy-People-Pills For All, and, for those just starting out, Happiness for Beginners. One of the consistent claims of books like these is that happiness is associated with all sorts of good life outcomes, including — most promisingly — good health. Many studies have noted the connection between a happy mind and a healthy body — the happier you are, the better health outcomes we seem to have. In a meta-analysis (overview) of 150 studies on this topic, researchers put it like this: “Inductions of well-being lead to healthy functioning, and inductions of ill-being lead to compromised health.” Being happy is about feeling good. Meaning is derived from contributing to others or to society in a bigger way. But a new study, just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) challenges […]

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How to Criticize with Kindness: Philosopher Daniel Dennett on the Four Steps to Arguing Intelligently

by Maria Popova (reposted from BrainPickings.org) “Just how charitable are you supposed to be when criticizing the views of an opponent?” “In disputes upon moral or scientific points,”Arthur Martine counseled in his magnificent 1866 guide to the art of conversation, “let your aim be to come at truth, not to conquer your opponent. So you never shall be at a loss in losing the argument, and gaining a new discovery.” Of course, this isn’t what happens most of the time when we argue, both online and off, but especially when we deploy the artillery of our righteousness from behind the comfortable shield of the keyboard. That form of “criticism” — which is really a menace of reacting rather than responding — is worthy of Mark Twain’s memorable remark that “the critic’s symbol should be the tumble-bug: he deposits his egg in somebody else’s dung, otherwise he could not hatch it.” But it needn’t be this way — there are ways to be critical while remaining charitable, of aiming not to “conquer” but to “come at truth,” not to be right at all costs but to understand and advance the collective understanding. Daniel Dennett (b. March 28, 1942), whom artificial intelligence pioneer Marvin […]

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